Dodgers: The great trade deadline dilemma of 2019

LOS ANGELES, CA - MAY 22: Andrew Friedman, President of Baseball Operations for the Los Angeles Dodgers, walks on the field before the game against the Colorado Rockies at Dodger Stadium on May 22, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - MAY 22: Andrew Friedman, President of Baseball Operations for the Los Angeles Dodgers, walks on the field before the game against the Colorado Rockies at Dodger Stadium on May 22, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images) /
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NEW YORK, NEW YORK – MAY 29: Gleyber Torres #25 of the New York Yankees hits a two run home run in the seventh inning against the San Diego Padres during their game at Yankee Stadium on May 29, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images) /

The Dodgers Made the Right Decision

According to my argument that Lux is better than Torres and Chapman was better than Vazquez is, it follows that Andrew Friedman and the Dodgers did indeed make the right decision. 

A club’s philosophy when evaluating the importance of future vs. present makes all the difference in the world whether a move is made or not.

I wasn’t in Chicago during the 2016 World Series but I’m extremely confident that the Cubs felt far more pressure to win it all in 2016 and certainly far more pressure then than the Dodgers do right now.

Because of that desperation, Aroldis Chapman wasn’t a frivolous acquisition, he was a necessity.

He wasn’t brought in because the Cubs wanted to “fine-tune” their roster. The Cubs gave up their #1 prospect and the #1 prospect in baseball because, without Chapman, the Cubs weren’t 100% confident they’d win it all and finally give their fanbase what’d been missing over 100 years: the ring.

The 2016 Cubs and the 2019 Dodgers are not in the same boat. The Dodgers have a bevy of future stars simply waiting in the ranks. Dave Roberts is still very young for a manager. From the insertion of Robert Van Scoyoc into the Dodgers’ organization, the hitters have flourished exponentially. The fanbase expects to win, sure, but our fanbase is not the Cubs.

Our fans aren’t rabidly foaming at the mouth for a championship ring. We expect a championship, of course, but the difference between the two is: Dodgers’ fans know that the next 5-10 years are in extremely capable hands throughout all aspects of an organization. If for whatever reason, the Dodgers don’t win it all, there’s not a single iota of doubt that next year won’t be the year.

Dodgers’ fans expect to win this year and for the next decade. That is the major difference between the Cubs’ and Dodgers’ franchises.