Dodgers or Chargers, who provides better sporting event in LA?

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA - JUNE 11: Smog hangs over the city on a day rated as having 'moderate' air quality in downtown Los Angeles, on June 11, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. According to the American Lung Association's annual "State of the Air" report, released in April and covering the years 2015-2017, Los Angeles holds the worst air pollution in the nation. The city has had the worst smog, otherwise known as ground-level ozone, in the U.S. for 19 of the past 20 years. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA - JUNE 11: Smog hangs over the city on a day rated as having 'moderate' air quality in downtown Los Angeles, on June 11, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. According to the American Lung Association's annual "State of the Air" report, released in April and covering the years 2015-2017, Los Angeles holds the worst air pollution in the nation. The city has had the worst smog, otherwise known as ground-level ozone, in the U.S. for 19 of the past 20 years. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images) /
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LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – JUNE 11: Smog hangs over the city on a day rated as having ‘moderate’ air quality in downtown Los Angeles, on June 11, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. According to the American Lung Association’s annual “State of the Air” report, released in April and covering the years 2015-2017, Los Angeles holds the worst air pollution in the nation. The city has had the worst smog, otherwise known as ground-level ozone, in the U.S. for 19 of the past 20 years. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images) /

Over the weekend, I was blessed to watch the Dodgers play on Saturday and the Chargers play on Sunday. After having seen both, one is slightly more fun.

In this article, I decided to run through the pros and cons of both experiences to try and demonstrate the LA sports scene. Before I get into a full-on comparison though of the two teams and their stadiums and more, I want to set the stage.

Obviously, not every sporting event is created equal. For some games, there is little at stake, or the matchup is not competitive, or the fan is not in an environment conducive to having a good time, namely if you’re a rival fan right behind the home dugout of a playoff game in St. Louis or Boston for example.

But for me, both of these games involved my rooting for my team, the home teams of the Dodgers and Chargers respectively. For the Dodgers game, I watched as they took on the Giants on a Saturday night, a 78-degree night with a nice breeze and sunset, in front of a sell out crowd in game two of an intense and historic rivalry with playoff seeding implications for the Dodgers.

For the Chargers, they took on a Andrew Luck-less Indianapolis Colts in front of a full stadium in what was both Week 1 of the NFL season and the 60th anniversary of the Chargers being an NFL franchise.

At both stadiums, I had the opportunity to sit in nice seats (through no expense of my own so don’t be mad at me), on field level for the Dodgers and on at the 50-yard line up near the top of the lower bowl for the Chargers.

Both teams played their opponents close, with the Dodgers painfully losing and getting one-hit, while the Chargers won in overtime after allowing a game-tying touchdown with 38 seconds left.

In this impromptu experiment, the situations were quite similar, which made the decision to write this comparative article quite easy.

Let’s get into it.

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