Dodgers: Who is the best catcher in franchise history?

BROOKLYN, NY - 1953: Brooklyn Dodgers catchers Roy Campanella, left, and Rube Walker (1926 - 1992), compare mitts before a game in 1953 at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn, New York. (Photo Reproduction by Transcendental Graphics/Getty Images)
BROOKLYN, NY - 1953: Brooklyn Dodgers catchers Roy Campanella, left, and Rube Walker (1926 - 1992), compare mitts before a game in 1953 at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn, New York. (Photo Reproduction by Transcendental Graphics/Getty Images) /
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LOS ANGELES, CA – CIRCA 1981: Mike Scioscia #14 of the Los Angeles Dodgers looks on during batting practice prior to the start of a Major League Baseball game circa 1981 at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California. Scioscia played for the Dodgers from 1980-92. (Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images) /

3) Mike Scioscia

Before Kirk Gibson limped around the bases in Game 1 of the 1988 World Series, it was Mike Scioscia’s home run against the Mets in Game 4 of the NLCS that miraculously saved the season. The Mets were on the verge of taking a commanding 3-1 series lead, with Doc Gooden ready to retire the final three batters, and Scioscia, who had hit three home runs all season, shocked the baseball world with a game-tying long ball.

You could put Scioscia as an honorable mention just for this one swing.

When you think of Mike Scioscia, you also think of loyalty. He played all 13 of his seasons in the majors with one team. And followed up his playing days with 18 consecutive seasons managing down the freeway with the Angels.

The Pennsylvania native made two All-Star games in his career, his performance measured in consistency more than superlatives. Between 1980-1991, his batting average barely ever deviated in a negative direction from his career .259 batting average. He appeared in 1394 games as a Dodger catcher, most in franchise history. Scioscia gets the lifetime achievement award for Dodger backstops.

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