Dodgers: Who is the best catcher in franchise history?

BROOKLYN, NY - 1953: Brooklyn Dodgers catchers Roy Campanella, left, and Rube Walker (1926 - 1992), compare mitts before a game in 1953 at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn, New York. (Photo Reproduction by Transcendental Graphics/Getty Images)
BROOKLYN, NY - 1953: Brooklyn Dodgers catchers Roy Campanella, left, and Rube Walker (1926 - 1992), compare mitts before a game in 1953 at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn, New York. (Photo Reproduction by Transcendental Graphics/Getty Images) /
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Dodgers
17 Apr 1998: Catcher Mike Piazza of the Los Angeles Dodgers in action during a game against the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field in Chicago, Illinois. The Dodgers defeated the Cubs 10-3. Mandatory Credit: Harry How /Allsport /

2) Mike Piazza

While things didn’t end as they should have with Mike Piazza in Los Angeles, he is still the second best catcher in franchise history. We could debate whether his statistics should count the same given the steroid era, but for now, we will leave that aside and focus on what he accomplished.

Drafted as a favor by godfather Tommy Lasorda in the 62nd round of the 1988 draft, Piazza quickly developed into a prolific slugger in the major leagues. After winning the Rookie of the Year Award in 1993 when he burst onto the scene with a .318 batting average, 35 home runs, and 112 RBIs, Piazza kept hitting and hitting and hitting.

Over his time with the Dodgers, he won six Silver Slugger Awards, appeared in six All-Star games, and finished in the top-five for MVP voting three times, including two second place finishes.

He hit 177 career home runs while calling Los Angeles home, a number that ranks him ninth in franchise history. His .572 slugging percentage puts him second all-time to Gary Sheffield. And his .966 OPS ranks third in team history.

While Piazza wasn’t known for his abilities behind the plate, during his time with the Dodgers, he was at least consistent in putting on the mask and pads. He deserves credit for suiting up nearly every single night at a punishing position, while still producing at the plate at an historic rate.

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