Dodgers: Five most untouchable players in trade talks

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Dodgers

Cody Bellinger, Los Angeles Dodgers (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

If an opposing general manager called Andrew Friedman to ask for a trade, who are the most untouchable players on the Los Angeles Dodgers roster?


The Los Angeles Dodgers won 106 games last season and then added Mookie Betts, one of the top all-around players in baseball, during the offseason. They have an embarrassment of riches at president Andrew Friedman’s and manager Dave Roberts‘ disposal. From Betts to 2019 MVP Cody Bellinger to Clayton Kershaw to Walker Buehler to a bench full of utility players that could possibly start on several teams, there aren’t many weaknesses on the Dodgers roster.

Oh, and did I mention they have one of the top farm systems in baseball? Have you heard of Gavin Lux? Or Dustin May? If not, you will know about them soon.

As we wait to learn the fate of the 2020 season, rosters are currently frozen. No transactions can take place until MLB and the player’s union figure out what the season will look like. But once roster moves are allowed to happen again, which Dodgers players would you refuse to trade?

In other words, if an opposing GM called Andrew Friedman, which names would receive the dial tone the quickest? The Dodgers are a “win now” team so they obviously wouldn’t be looking to unload any of their established players. That said, it’s still an interesting thought exercise to consider the relative value of their top players in terms of who is the most untouchable in trade talks.

Honorable Mentions:

I debated putting Dustin May in the top five. I decided to go with another top prospect, but the team’s best pitching prospect is still pretty untouchable.

Max Muncy is one of Andrew Friedman’s best finds. Signed to a minor league deal in 2017, the 29-year-old has turned into a prodigious power-hitter in Dodger blue. He has hit 70 home runs over the past two years, after connecting on only five in his first two seasons trying to break into the majors. He will only make $2.5 million in 2020 with his three-year, $26 million favorably back-loaded with a club option for a fourth year.

Now, let’s get into the list.

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