Dodgers: John Smoltz seems to invent Twitter with bizarre NLDS comment

Adam Weinrib
ATLANTA, GA - OCTOBER 02: Former Atlanta Braves player John Smoltz stands in the dugout after the game against the Detroit Tigers at Turner Field on October 2, 2016 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Daniel Shirey/Getty Images)
ATLANTA, GA - OCTOBER 02: Former Atlanta Braves player John Smoltz stands in the dugout after the game against the Detroit Tigers at Turner Field on October 2, 2016 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Daniel Shirey/Getty Images) /
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Former Braves pitcher John Smoltz wanted to create something identical to Twitter on the Dodgers broadcast last night.

Through the first half of Thursday night’s Dodgers-Braves NLCS Game 4, we were sitting through a real barnburner.

Managerial second-guessing left and right. Where’s Chris Taylor? Who starts Game 5? Should Clayton Kershaw have simply sucked it up and pitched Game 2, as he had previously been scheduled to?

Evidently, John Smoltz on the broadcast had heard enough of the chatter from the baseball world, and he got fed up by the middle of the fifth inning with all the discourse. But then he had an idea.

What if there was a place … some magical app … where the world at large could voice their displeasure with the decisions of others? Some open forum meant for free thought, but used almost entirely for criticism? Mr. Smoltz … I believe you may have something here.

You laugh, but Smoltz has a ton of seed money ready for someone to produce a carbon copy of Twitter. Any takers?

We’re not sure why anyone, sarcastically or otherwise, would endorse the creation of one Twitter, though, let alone two.

Luckily, it seems like the most plugged-in baseball analysts agreed with us.

This series has been particularly frustrating for Dodgers fans, of course, who don’t have any interest in hopping into an online community to discuss things in more details.

The bad news continues to inundate us whether we want to read it or not, and the creation of an additional Twitter-like app (especially by Smoltz, a freaking Braves pitcher who theoretically should be calling this series impartially) sounds like hell on earth.

But don’t let anybody tell you innovation is dead! People are creating new ideas that are exact doubles of ideas that already exist every day in America. Embrace innovation.

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