Dodgers: Larry King’s final Instagram post is very fitting

Adam Weinrib
LOS ANGELES, CA - MAY 28: Talk show host Larry King attends the 2nd Annual Bark In The Park at Dodgers' Stadium on May 28, 2011 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by David Livingston/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - MAY 28: Talk show host Larry King attends the 2nd Annual Bark In The Park at Dodgers' Stadium on May 28, 2011 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by David Livingston/Getty Images) /
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Iconic Dodgers fan Larry King’s last Instagram post comes from the team’s World Series championship.

Tommy Lasorda. Sandi Scully. Larry King. Los Angeles has lost three prominent Dodgers fans in the past month, all of whom bled blue ’til the very end.

King became the most recent familiar face to pass away, losing his battle with COVID-19 on Saturday at the age of 87. Needless to say, the next time fans are allowed in Dodger Stadium, it will be somewhat jarring to reckon with the idea that his Brooklyn Dodgers hat will no longer be spotted bobbing just above the advertising behind home plate.

Somewhat tragically, Los Angeles’ drought-breaking title this postseason came largely without fans in attendance, though Lasorda famously made it to Texas to celebrate along with his brethren.

As the confetti dropped, we got a sneak peak at King’s celebration thanks to the broadcasting legend’s personal Instagram, and he was at least able to share the moment with his younger sons, who celebrated their first Dodgers title ever.

https://twitter.com/ecvdblk/status/1353035321256988672?s=20

Tragically, that Oct. 27 missive was the final Instagram post King ever released — before his team took over the account on Saturday to announce the icon’s death.

Though every Los Angeles denizen knows this, King was a genuine Dodgers fan, all the way back to his first ever game at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn back in 1943.

King was in attendance at seemingly every big Dodgers moment across the current timeline of elite baseball at Chavez Ravine, but his presence at historic moments dates all the way back to 1947, when he attended Jackie Robinson’s barrier-breaking major league debut.

From Brooklyn to Hollywood, the Dodgers certainly mirrored the iconic King’s career trajectory.

Though the fan service of “cutouts” will hopefully leave most MLB ballparks once the pandemic is under control, the Dodgers would be wise to leave a chair firmly covered with a King representation once the gates are open next year.

It simply wouldn’t feel like the complete picture otherwise.

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