Former Dodgers pitcher’s lawsuit to take down cheating Astros isn’t going well

Thomas Carannante
LOS ANGELES, CA - JUNE 18: Mike Bolsinger #46 of the Los Angeles Dodgers pitches to the Milwaukee Brewers during the first inning at Dodger Stadium on June 18, 2016 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - JUNE 18: Mike Bolsinger #46 of the Los Angeles Dodgers pitches to the Milwaukee Brewers during the first inning at Dodger Stadium on June 18, 2016 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images) /
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Remember the Houston Astros’ sign-stealing scandal? You know, the one that completely screwed the Los Angeles Dodgers out of the 2017 World Series?

You know what? Why even care anymore? The Dodgers are the reigning champs and the Astros are trending far, far downward. We’ll gladly move past it in exchange for what the future holds.

But one former Dodger is far from putting all of this in the rearview. In case you don’t recall, Mike Bolsinger filed a lawsuit against the Astros for their cheating — which was confirmed by MLB — and has been fighting them in court for over a year, but he’s now losing steam.

He spoke with the Los Angeles Times this past weekend and on Monday an LA superior court judge tentatively threw out the case. It could still continue in Texas, but that’ll be a much more difficult endeavor.

In classic Astros fashion, they belittled Bolsinger in court, calling his efforts a publicity stunt and suggesting the whole ordeal was “quixotic,” according to the LA Times.

Bolsinger feels that the Astros bludgeoning him on Aug. 4, 2017 — at the height of their cheating scandal — in Houston cost him his major league career. At that point, he was with the Toronto Blue Jays after spending three years with the Dodgers. But on that fateful day, the rightly gave up four runs on four hits and three walks in 1/3 of an inning and was never to be seen in MLB again. He got DFA’ed and has since pitched two years overseas, but hasn’t played any baseball in the last two years.

Now, with his case likely either headed to Texas or being dropped altogether, Bolsinger’s efforts to hold the Astros accountable (in a sense) for their detrimental actions probably won’t come to fruition. MLB did little to condemn it, so why would the court system? Sick world, we know.

Unfortunately for Bolsinger, his career numbers don’t entirely back him up in the case (8-19 with a 4.92 ERA and 1.51 WHIP) and no other player has come forward to join him in this legal battle. While just about every MLB fan wants to see the Astros go down in flames, a judge will be hard-pressed to look at this evidence and find Houston fully at fault here.

Keep fighting the good fight, Mike. But at this point, you may just have to join the rest of the fans in the stands this season to give the Astros what they deserve: incessant boos and jeers.

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