Dodgers: Noah Syndergaard could be perfect rotation addition in offseason

Thomas Carannante
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - SEPTEMBER 28: Noah Syndergaard #34 of the New York Mets pitches during the first inning in game 2 of a double header against the Miami Marlins at Citi Field on September 28, 2021 in New York City. The Mets defeated the Marlins 2-1 in nine innings. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - SEPTEMBER 28: Noah Syndergaard #34 of the New York Mets pitches during the first inning in game 2 of a double header against the Miami Marlins at Citi Field on September 28, 2021 in New York City. The Mets defeated the Marlins 2-1 in nine innings. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images) /
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You want to talk about a “classic” Los Angeles Dodgers signing? You might see yet another this offseason.

Andrew Friedman and the front office have settled in so comfortably since 2015 that fans all around the sport know those tailor-made Dodgers moves when they see them. And we’re not talking about the blockbusters. Those are inherent with their spending power and prospect capital.

We’re talking about the shrewd under-the-radar transactions that further bolster the roster like you would’ve never imagined or expected. To name a few? Signing Blake Treinen after his 2019 struggles. Trading for Corey Knebel this past offseason. Picking up Brusdar Graterol in a trade before the 2020 season when the Red Sox jumped ship.

Well, come November, don’t be surprised if the Dodgers continue their characteristic string of such transactions when New York Mets starter Noah Syndergaard hits the open market.

Noah Syndergaard might be the perfect offseason fit for the Los Angeles Dodgers.

We’d equate this to something along the lines of an AJ Pollock signing. You know the talent and ceiling is there, but injuries have played a big role. Smaller clubs may not take the risk, but the Dodgers would have no problem swooping in, offering more money, and deepening their rotation.

Assuming they bring back Max Scherzer and Clayton Kershaw, Syndergaard’s addition will give them a full rotation alongside Walker Buehler and Julio Urias. We can safely assume Dustin May won’t be back until next June at the earliest, and he’ll be on an innings limit, so perhaps he’s in a middle relief role to maximize his efficiency for 2022.

As for the Mets, they might have the richest owner in the sport, but we watched the $14 billion Steve Cohen pass on JT Realmuto in favor of James McCann. He also refused to sign George Springer and opted for short-term cost-effective options. Then the team lost all hope when Jacob deGrom went down with an elbow injury. With so many other positions and incumbent players to worry about, Syndergaard likely won’t be a top priority.

And the fact he thinks he’s getting a qualifying offer from the Mets is … kind of hilarious? Is there any reason a team that needs to build upon its foundation would offer a player who has barely pitched in two years almost $19 million for one season? Props to Syndergaard for shooting for the stars, but nice try. The Mets won’t be dishing out money irresponsibly to “go for it all” in 2022 after they were exposed in their first season under Cohen.

That’s where the Dodgers come in. How about a three-year, $48 million contract? Maybe a two-year, $32 million deal? Maybe something more! Who knows. They can afford it and such a short-term deal would allow the right-hander to hit free agency again in his early 30s (next year will be his age-29 campaign).

Syndergaard clearly wants some sort of financial security if he’s casually slipping in the prospect of the qualifying offer after his first start since Sept. 29, 2019. The Dodgers can give him a little bit more if he’s willing to chip in an extra year or two. And that might move the needle for Thor.

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