3 Scrooge moves the Dodgers made that killed fans’ Christmas spirit

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA - OCTOBER 11: Max Scherzer #31 of the Los Angeles Dodgers reacts after striking out LaMonte Wade Jr. #31 of the San Francisco Giants during the fourth inning in game 3 of the National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on October 11, 2021 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA - OCTOBER 11: Max Scherzer #31 of the Los Angeles Dodgers reacts after striking out LaMonte Wade Jr. #31 of the San Francisco Giants during the fourth inning in game 3 of the National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on October 11, 2021 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images) /
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Andrew Heaney #38 of the New York Yankees (Photo by Rich Schultz/Getty Images)
Andrew Heaney #38 of the New York Yankees (Photo by Rich Schultz/Getty Images) /

The Los Angeles Dodgers just paid a $32.65 million luxury tax bill, so it’s obvious they have money to spend and/or waste. But before the lockout, they only made a few uninspiring transactions, the highlight of which was re-signing Chris Taylor — something that needed to get done after he said he was willing to take a discount to remain in LA.

Otherwise? Underwhelming. And the losses of Max Scherzer and Corey Seager as well as the unlikely return of Kenley Jansen hardly let any positives take the spotlight. Not to mention, Clayton Kershaw is still a free agent for the first time in his career and is stuck there while the owners and players sort things out.

On top of that, we didn’t get an extension for Trea Turner, the starting rotation wasn’t repaired whatsoever, and the bullpen lost a number of key contributors. Dodgers fans feel more vulnerable than ever heading into 2022 (you didn’t forget about Max Muncy’s UCL tear, did you?)

And since the Dodgers knew fans would be stuck in the lockout during Christmas time, we can’t help but feel they brought down the jolly spirit by being Scrooges and passing on some moves they certainly possessed the financial capital to make happen … and instead making one that felt like a cost-cutter but was actually an overpay?

Though the front office has plenty of time post-lockout to make up for this, it’s not going to change our feelings on this Merry (?) Christmas.

3 Scrooge moves the Dodgers made to kill Christmas spirit.

3. Signing Andrew Heaney

Right out of the gate, the Dodgers, for some reason, thought it’d be a shrewd decision to sign veteran left-hander Andrew Heaney to a one-year, $8.5 million contract, which he was obviously eager and ecstatic to accept since no team in their right minds would’ve offered him anything above $5 million.

Sorry to sound harsh, but on what planet does Heaney have an integral role in a rotation that just lost Scherzer, won’t have Dustin May until at least the middle of the season, and might watch Clayton Kershaw leave?

Heaney has NEVER had a good MLB season since debuting in 2014. His best campaign featured a losing record with a 4.15 ERA, 1.20 WHIP, 3.99 FIP and 180 strikeouts in 180 innings (30 starts). That was by FAR his most efficient from a full workload standpoint.

And in 2021, he proved he was truly that bad. Between the Angels and Yankees, the soft-throwing lefty finished with a 5.83 ERA in 30 games (23 starts) and allowed 29 homers, including 13 in his final 35.2 innings. He did up his strikeouts (150 in 129.2 innings) and his FIP was a full run lower than his ERA, but this isn’t an untapped talent waiting to be unleashed. Heaney is going to be 31 years old and doesn’t strike fear into batters.

Discouraging move for the talent and the money spent.