Dodgers Spanish broadcaster makes important point about MLB lockout

Thomas Carannante
LOS ANGELES, CA - SEPTEMBER 21: Longtime Los Angeles Dodgers broadcaster Jaime Jarrin acknowledges the crowd after being inducted into the Dodger Stadium Ring of Honor the game against the San Diego Paders at Dodger Stadium on September 2, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - SEPTEMBER 21: Longtime Los Angeles Dodgers broadcaster Jaime Jarrin acknowledges the crowd after being inducted into the Dodger Stadium Ring of Honor the game against the San Diego Paders at Dodger Stadium on September 2, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images) /
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The MLB lockout is dragging and fans are becoming angrier and angrier by the day. Just go take a look at Los Angeles Dodgers Twitter — it’s not a pretty place.

At this point, we can expect spring training to be delayed and Opening Day to be pushed back. This all comes after multiple esteemed baseball insiders assured us months ago that the 2022 season wouldn’t be interrupted by collective bargaining agreement negotiations. Thanks, guys.

Another aspect of the lockout that’s becoming increasingly frustrating is people freaking out any time somebody mentions that the players deserve a portion of the blame for how slow this process has been. The players certainly aren’t the bad guys here, but they’re not exactly helping expedite ending the lockout.

If they were, instead of publicly complaining and shaming MLB for their poor offers at the drop of a hat, they’d also be pulling all-nighters with their lawyers to pinpoint areas where they can take advantage of the owners, specifically with the issues that are most pertinent to the union.

At the end of the day, neither side is going to walk away with victories on every single point of negotiation/contention. It’s picking your battles and finding windows of opportunity. It’s now on the players to make a counter offer, and we haven’t heard a peep since Saturday.

Dodgers legendary Spanish broadcaster Jaime Jarrín weighed in on the matter and has been of the few reasonable, influential voices to mention how the players might be at fault.

Dodgers Spanish broadcaster Jaime Jarrín tweeted about the lockout.

Here’s what the tweet translates to:

“If there is sincerity in both, the union should have a marathon session studying the 130 pages of the owners’ proposal and immediately submit a counter proposal, then the owners do not take a week to respond; the situation is pressing and negotiations must continue without stopping.”

The owners have shown a willingness to bend in some areas, but in many ways it hasn’t been “enough.” And though it’s clear they’re refusing to reveal their hand, it’s on the players to force it. The negotiation was never promised to be the owners saying, “OK, fine, we’ve reaped SO many financial benefits for a long time. Here’s everything you want on Day 1.”

Jarrín said what needs to be expressed more widely and comfortably. The union should’ve been anticipating the stinginess from the billionaire owners who have taken advantage of their work situation for generations, not hoping for a 180 turnaround to have their requests granted without any pushback.

Again, nobody should be siding with the owners in any capacity. They sit back, collect profits, and work to cut costs and suppress wages. They also took six weeks to make their first proposal to the players after the lockout began. Unforgivable. Rob Manfred should be overthrown if it were possible. The absolute gall is unmatchable. We just exited a COVID-shortened season with every single owner whining about lost profits because of fans not being allowed in parks/stadiums.

Since the first “offer” was made on Jan. 13, we’ve had one more offer, which came this past Saturday. Both of them have been from the owners. Outside of that, there were three total meetings on Jan. 24 and 25 as well as Feb. 3. The owners are hardly doing anything constructive, but it seems the players’ response is just as ineffective in moving the talks along.

The continued reports of core issue meetings lasting an hour or the players “walking out” after talks went sour is just making all of this look worse. Submit a counter proposal, put pressure on the owners, and show how unwilling they are to bend on important topics that concern the well being of the players. That’ll get the ball rolling and help get more media criticism hurled in the direction it should be.

But Jarrín’s overall messaging is correct. The players aren’t absolved from every bit of blame here, and they’re playing just as impactful of a role in these negotiations as the owners are. If they can take control and shift the tides, we’ll all be closer to getting baseball back.

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