3 Dodgers who’ll be hurt by MLB banning the shift in 2023

Adam Weinrib
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA - SEPTEMBER 12: Justin Turner #10 of the Los Angeles Dodgers hits a three run home run against the San Diego Padres in the seventh inning at Dodger Stadium on September 12, 2021 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Meg Oliphant/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA - SEPTEMBER 12: Justin Turner #10 of the Los Angeles Dodgers hits a three run home run against the San Diego Padres in the seventh inning at Dodger Stadium on September 12, 2021 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Meg Oliphant/Getty Images) /
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Trea Turner #6 of the Los Angeles Dodgers (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images) /

1. Trea Turner

If Trea Turner re-ups with the Dodgers either before or after the 2022 season, the team can unfortunately expect a monstrous regression without the shift to rely on in 2023.

Kidding! Kidding. He’ll still be great. But Turner is certainly among the modern superstars who take full advantage in rare situations where the shift is offered to them.

The infield speedster is the platonic ideal of a player you can’t shift on. You want to give the burner third base? He’ll take a single, double or triple, no problem. If he stops at first, he might be able to make it to second one or two pitches later anyway. There’s no limiting Turner’s progress around the horn if you’re giving him a free base to start things off.

Of course, against a standard alignment, he can also rope liners into the seats with regularity. He’s a 30-homer bat. There’s no defense for those bombs.

Much like Justin Turner, Trea faced a classic defense in 91.8% of his plate appearances, posting a .369 wOBA.

Against the shift in 53 plate appearances, though? A patently absurd .546 wOBA. .546!!

Turner’s life won’t change drastically once the shift is taken off the table, but again, when you shift on him, you’re essentially gifting him a free run-scoring opportunity. He’ll miss those.

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