Freddie Freeman’s emotional statement tries to stop Dodgers-Braves drama

Adam Weinrib
ATLANTA, GA - JUNE 26: Freddie Freeman #5 of the Los Angeles Dodgers races to third during the sixth inning against the Atlanta Braves at Truist Park on June 26, 2022 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Todd Kirkland/Getty Images)
ATLANTA, GA - JUNE 26: Freddie Freeman #5 of the Los Angeles Dodgers races to third during the sixth inning against the Atlanta Braves at Truist Park on June 26, 2022 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Todd Kirkland/Getty Images) /
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Don’t believe Los Angeles Dodgers first baseman Freddie Freeman if you don’t want to, but after a whirlwind 72 hours in Atlanta and days (weeks?) of preparation for what that reception might feel like, he’s done dwelling in the past.

Draw your own conclusions for the rapid dismissal of the agents who led him to Los Angeles and away from Atlanta. Consider the player, the man, who’s triple-slashed .412/.487/.706 in his last eight games, then ask if he’s still unfit to wear Dodger Blue because he cares about the old days, too.

If this is Freeman when the Dodgers are playing “second fiddle,” we can’t wait to see what the next several years of his contract look like.

The cat’s already out of the bag and clawing, but to his credit, Freeman made an additional statement Tuesday evening to try to cut off the discourse.

While the ambitions of Atlanta fans may differ, Freeman needs closure now. He admitted on Tuesday that he’d spent most of the season in the “grieving” process, and intended the dismissal of his agents to create a hard break/calcify the “healing” process.

Whether it works or not, Freeman will likely keep hitting.

Dodgers’ Freddie Freeman fires agents to focus on Los Angeles

“I’m a Dodger. I’m a Dodger for the next six years,” qualifies as the bare minimum and a boilerplate retelling of the objective truth, but if Freeman wants to move on, Dodgers fans should let him. After all, it’s very much in their best interest for their imported, long-term leader to be comfortable, and when October rolls around, Braves fans won’t exactly be so cooperative.

An Atlanta-Los Angeles clash looms both this postseason and each year into the future, and Braves fans are likely to overwhelm Freeman with kindness in an effort to bring this narrative back to the forefront — as if it wouldn’t already be tough enough for him to adjust to the internal pressure alone. The best thing the All-Star first baseman can do now is attempt to pull down the blinds. If that involves cleaning house and removing all reminders of the people who helped dictate his journey away from Atlanta, then so be it.

Freeman is a professional — and, most importantly, he’s a professional hitter. If he’s shutting the grieving process down now — or, at least, vocalizing his intent to do so — it’s incumbent upon Dodgers fans to help him move on by embracing the master at work.

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