3 positions the Dodgers should target over Luis Castillo at the deadline

Jason Reed
CINCINNATI, OHIO - JULY 03: Luis Castillo #58 of the Cincinnati Reds walks back to the dugout in the game against the Atlanta Braves at Great American Ball Park on July 03, 2022 in Cincinnati, Ohio. (Photo by Justin Casterline/Getty Images)
CINCINNATI, OHIO - JULY 03: Luis Castillo #58 of the Cincinnati Reds walks back to the dugout in the game against the Atlanta Braves at Great American Ball Park on July 03, 2022 in Cincinnati, Ohio. (Photo by Justin Casterline/Getty Images) /
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(Photo by Joe Puetz/Getty Images)
(Photo by Joe Puetz/Getty Images) /

3. Right-Handed Bench Bat

Hanser Alberto has been the team’s primary right-handed bench bat this season and, for the most part, he has not been very good. That being said, he did just deliver the game-winning hit against the St. Louis Cardinals and has been heating up as of late.

If Alberto, with his .587 OPS, is your best right-handed bench bat, then you are going to have problems. While this role is not even in the starting lineup it is still extremely important for the way the Dodgers’ team is built.

The Dodgers are so left-handed heavy, and even some of the team’s right-handed hitters are reverse split guys who fare worse against southpaws. Having that one bat that can rake against lefties to put into a big spot is so huge for October baseball.

It is also something the Dodgers love to have on the roster. Albert Pujols was that guy last year, before him it was David Freese, and before him, it was Enrique Hernandez before he became an everyday starter (and it panned out, with Hernandez blasting three home runs in one game in the 2017 NLCS).

This right-handed bench bat is such an important cog in the wheel for the Dodgers. It does not have to be someone spectacular or someone who needs to even get ample playing time. It just needs to be someone to mash lefties.

Heck, maybe the Dodgers can knock out two birds with one stone and trade for someone like Robbie Grossman. Grossman is a switch-hitting outfielder who has a .943 OPS against left-handed pitching.

Just saying. All three needs matter more than a potential costly Castillo addition.

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