5 Dodgers who desperately need a wake-up call after the All-Star Break

Jason Reed
ATLANTA, GA - JUNE 24: Cody Bellinger #35 of the Los Angeles Dodgers flips his bat after striking out during the fourth inning against the Atlanta Braves at Truist Park on June 24, 2022 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Todd Kirkland/Getty Images)
ATLANTA, GA - JUNE 24: Cody Bellinger #35 of the Los Angeles Dodgers flips his bat after striking out during the fourth inning against the Atlanta Braves at Truist Park on June 24, 2022 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Todd Kirkland/Getty Images) /
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(Photo by Joe Puetz/Getty Images)
(Photo by Joe Puetz/Getty Images) /

Dodgers that will lose a roster spot if they don’t wake up

This group of players does not include those who are only on the roster right now because of injuries. We all know that the likes of McKinstry and Thompson are not long-term roster solutions and are just depth options for the time being.

These are players who were meant to be staples of the 26-man roster this season that should get demoted if they do not figure it out fast.

2. Phil Bickford

Bickford has not been able to follow up his breakout 2021 season with anything remotely successful in 2022. While Bickford started the season on a great note, it has gone extremely downhill since then. Bickford is sporting a 5.04 ERA on the season and has allowed a run in 10 of his last 17 outings. That just isn’t good enough.

Reinforcements are on the way with players getting healthy as well as the Dodgers potentially adding relievers at the trade deadline. If Bickford can’t rediscover his 2021 form, he’s going to be one of the first players to get demoted.

1. Hanser Alberto

Alberto was brought in to be the Dodgers’ right-handed bench bat this season and he’s been nothing short of bad (though his energy and clubhouse presence is notable). Aside from two scoreless relief outings and a game-winning hit against the St. Louis Cardinals, Alberto has not done much of anything for the Dodgers this season.

He has a below-average .600 OPS and 64 OPS+, meaning that he’s 36% below league-average as a hitter. And keep in mind that Alberto is only hitting in matchups that directly favor him. There are no excuses for his numbers to be this bad when he’s being put in situations to succeed.

If Alberto doesn’t start torching southpaws soon, then the Dodgers are going to look to replace him with someone who does.

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