Mets’ Edwin Diaz stunt vs Dodgers will definitely backfire

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - AUGUST 13: Edwin Diaz #39 of the New York Mets reacts after pitching the final out during the ninth inning against the Philadelphia Phillies at Citi Field on August 13, 2022 in the Queens borough of New York City. The Mets won 1-0. (Photo by Sarah Stier/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - AUGUST 13: Edwin Diaz #39 of the New York Mets reacts after pitching the final out during the ninth inning against the Philadelphia Phillies at Citi Field on August 13, 2022 in the Queens borough of New York City. The Mets won 1-0. (Photo by Sarah Stier/Getty Images) /
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The 2022 New York Mets seem to have no idea that they’re a continuation of the same Mets franchise known mostly for flying too close to the sun. Shockingly, the team seems to have pre-planned another blunder for this week’s showdown at Citi Field with the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Though Steve Cohen’s pockets are deeper than any other MLB owner’s and he’s proven time and again he’s willing to go above and beyond to turn his beloved Mets from a laughingstock to a world-beater, he’s still got decades worth of stink to shake off. Stink that goes way beyond the spendthrift Wilpons’ cheap ownership.

From the 1986 Mets taking themselves off the top of the world with endless self-sabotage to the 2007 and 2008 collapses that closed Shea Stadium with 10,000 whimpers, there’s a lot of baggage here. The kind of baggage you’d typically avoid adding to the pile intentionally, if you had that opportunity.

But, again … these Mets think they’re different. They think there was a clean break. And that’s why they’re taking hyper-advantage of closer Edwin Diaz’s viral entrance song and routine against the Dodgers this week during a regular-season matchup.

Diaz is 28-for-31 in save opportunities this season. Surely, that means he’s all out of blown saves for the postseason … right?

Dodgers can take advantage of Mets’ Edwin Diaz gaffe

The fear isn’t that the Dodgers put the pressure on Diaz this week and he blows a late-August save. The fear is that this becomes the moment everything turned and the other shoe dropped for the Mets, leading to another poorly-timed October hiccup like whatever happened to Jeurys Familia in 2015 in Kansas City.

You don’t even have to look that far back for an example of an historically-tortured team’s hubris coming back to bite them. The 2021 Red Sox invited “Dancing on My Own” cover artist Calum Scott to throw out the first pitch before Game 4 of the ALCS. At the time, the Sox held a 2-1 series lead over the Astros and had turned Scott’s cover into their series-ending locker room celebration song.

“Sadly,” that series ended that night; the Sox were outscored 23-3 in the remaining three games.

Will the 2022 New York Mets meet the same fate after rubbing Timmy Trumpet in the Dodgers’ faces for a meaningless August battle? Who’s to say? Check the history books and let us know which of these two franchises typically receives the benefit of the doubt.