Kiké Hernández has predictably hilarious reaction to Dodgers' strikeout-free game

Los Angeles Dodgers v Washington Nationals
Los Angeles Dodgers v Washington Nationals / G Fiume/GettyImages
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On Monday night, during their first game of the year against the Diamondbacks who swept them in brutal fashion during the NLDS last season, the Dodgers looked cool, collected, and less concerned with getting revenge than just playing a complete game of baseball.

And they did. The Dodgers' lineup collected 10 hits, eight walks, and eight RBI. Andy Pages was responsible for three of those runs (a sac fly and a two-run double) and Will Smith collected his third home run of the season. James Paxton gave up all four of the runs the Diamondbacks put up in response, but the bullpen — Daniel Hudson to a struggling Joe Kelly to Alex Vesia to Evan Phillips — only allowed one hit among them in four innings.

But Dodgers hitters were also quietly accomplishing a rare feat throughout the entire game. Outs were coming on pop ups and ground outs and so on, but no one was striking out. By the time the game was over, the Diamondbacks' pitching staff hadn't managed to strike out a single LA batter.

After the game, Kiké Hernández, who had a pretty good night himself (two hits, an RBI, and a walk) had a characteristically blunt reaction (subscription required) — "I was like, 'What the f—? No Ks? [...] That's pretty f—ing cool."

Dodgers batters refused to strike out against the Diamondbacks, and Kiké Hernández had the perfect reaction

The Dodgers haven't gone nine innings without striking out since 2006, during a game against the Reds that they won 6-5. Hernández might've been the first person to notice that they were doing it again 18 years later, when he looked up at the strikeout sign at Chase Field to find zero K's on the board. The rest of the team took a little longer to recognize it; Freddie Freeman and Dave Roberts were both informed after the game by reporters.

It was a particularly notable feat for the Dodgers, who have some big free-swingers in Shohei Ohtani, Max Muncy, and Teoscar Hernández. Their patience at the plate and struggles to hit with runners in scoring position have been two of the biggest concerns of the season so far, so the fact that they were able to turn half of their baserunners into runs and never get punched out will hopefully set something of a precedent for them going forward.

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