Could MLB lockout affect Dodgers’ Dustin May in Tommy John recovery?

Thomas Carannante
SEATTLE, WASHINGTON - APRIL 19: Dustin May #85 of the Los Angeles Dodgers reacts after giving up a two-run home run to Jose Marmolejos #26 of the Seattle Mariners during the first inning at T-Mobile Park on April 19, 2021 in Seattle, Washington. (Photo by Abbie Parr/Getty Images)
SEATTLE, WASHINGTON - APRIL 19: Dustin May #85 of the Los Angeles Dodgers reacts after giving up a two-run home run to Jose Marmolejos #26 of the Seattle Mariners during the first inning at T-Mobile Park on April 19, 2021 in Seattle, Washington. (Photo by Abbie Parr/Getty Images) /
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Care for some more concerning Los Angeles Dodgers news? It really hasn’t been the greatest few months for the organization and even a work stoppage couldn’t help that.

Now, the Dodgers are staring down the barrel of a heated race to free agents and the trade market once the lockout is lifted … and they have numerous glaring voids to address. Fans have all the trust in Andrew Friedman and the front office, but that’s far from an easy task, even for the most accomplished executives in the sport.

But another concern that’s flown under the radar is how injured players will get through the offseason. Why? Because players cannot communicate with any members of their organizations … and that includes team doctors.

So what will starting pitcher Dustin May do for the next few months as he recovers from Tommy John surgery? Doesn’t this kind of scenario figure to be problematic for a 24-year-old who is trying to make a comeback and pitch around half of next season?

Dodgers’ Dustin May’s rehab to be affected by MLB lockout?

Though May has said his recovery has gone “smoothly,” we’re just not sure how that’s going to continue on the desired trajectory if he’s not in constant lockstep with the Dodgers’ medical staff, who are the most important figures in helping him get back on the mound as soon as possible.

Yankees’ starting pitcher Jameson Taillon, who underwent ankle surgery this offseason, cracked a joke about having to undergo physical therapy by himself … but how much of a joke is this, really?

Being forced to go solo in your rehabilitation following a reconstructive elbow procedure sounds frightening. Maybe May is at a point in his rehab where he can go on autopilot, but not being under the care of the same doctors that oversaw your journey from going under the knife back in May until you first started throwing a baseball in October feels like an unfair risk.

Once again, we cannot state how important May remaining on a positive trajectory and getting back on track truly is. He was set for a breakout campaign in 2021 before it was derailed by the season-ending injury, and now he’ll be working his way back up from scratch with 2022 serving as a launch pad for his hopeful new targeted breakout in 2023.

Should any of that be negatively affected by MLB’s first work stoppage in over 25 years, we can’t say history will look back on this moment kindly.

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